Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke

Male 1146 - 1219


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  • Name  Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke  [1
    Title  Sir 
    Suffix  1st Earl of Pembroke 
    Born  1146  Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  14 May 1219  London, Greater London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Temple Church, Temple District, City of London, Greater London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I6122  adkinshorton
    Last Modified  28 Apr 2019 

    Father  John FITZGILBERT, 'the Marshal',   d. 1242 
    Mother  Sybil DE SALISBURY,   b. Abt 1127, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID  F25299  Group Sheet

    Family  Isabel DE CLARE, Countess of Pembroke,   b. 1172, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1220 
    Married  Aug 1189  London, Greater London, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Gilbert Marshal, 4th Earl of Pembroke,   b. 1194,   d. 27 Jun 1241
     2. Anselme MARSHAL, 6th Earl of Pembroke,   d. 22 Dec 1245
     3. Sybil (Sybilla) MARSHAL
     4. Joan (Joanna) MARSHAL
     5. William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke,   b. 1190,   d. 1231
     6. Richard MARSHAL, 3rd Earl of Pembroke,   b. 1191,   d. 16 Apr 1234
     7. Maud (Matilda) MARSHAL, *,   b. 1192,   d. 27 Mar 1248
     8. Walter MARSHAL, 5th Earl of Pembroke,   b. 1198,   d. Nov 1245
    >9. Eve MARSHAL,   b. Abt 1199, Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1245
     10. Isabela MARSHAL,   b. 9 Oct 1200,   d. 17 Jan 1240
    Family ID  F25247  Group Sheet

  • Headstones
    Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke
    Sir William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke
    Effigy at Temple Church in London

  • Notes 
    • William Marshal, born in 1146 and died in 1219, was of the great baronial family of Marischal, marshal to the king. See Burke, pg. 358-359. This William is first mentioned as receiving from Prince Henry, the rebellious son of Henry II., upon the prince's deathbed, his cross, as his most confidential friend, to convey to Jerusalem. He married Isabel (Eva) Clare, only child and heiress of Richard de Clare (surnamed Strongbow), Earl of Pembroke, conqueror of Ireland and Justice of Ireland. She had been under the guardianship of Henry II., who gave her in marriage in 1189. Through his wife, William acquired the Earldom of Pembroke, in which rank he bore the royal scepter of gold surmounted by the cross, at the coronation of King Richard I.; and he was soon afterwards, on the king's purposing a journey to the Holy Land, appointed one of the assistants to Hugh, Bishop of Durham, and William, Earl of Albemarle, Chief Justice of England, in the government of the realm. He was brother and male heir, of John Marshal, otherwise Mareschall. This family enjoyed the office of marshal of the King's House, and from that post assumed its surname; which gave occasion, says Banks, to their being often styled Earls Marshal, as well as Earls of Striguil and Pembroke; but such denomination was matter of curiality more then of reality. The manor of Hempsted-Marshal, in Berkshire, belonging to the Marshals, was held of old by grand serjeanty of the Kings of England, to be the knights marshal, as the offices of steward, constable, etc. were in those times granted. Upon the decease of his brother, John Mareschall, marshal of the king's house, in 1199, he became Lord Marshal; and on the day of the coronation of King John, he was invested with sword of the Earldom of Pembroke, being then confirmed in the possession of the said inheritance. In the first year of the monarch's reign, he was appointed sheriff of Gloucestershire, and likewise of Sussex, wherein he was continued for several years. In the 5th year he had a grant of Goderich Castle, in the co. Hereford, to hold by the service of two knight's fees; and in four years afterwards, he obtained, by grant from the crown, the whole province of Leinster, in Ireland, to hold by the service of one hundred knight's fees. Upon the breaking out of the baronial insurrection, the Earl of Pembroke was deputed, with the Archbishop of Canterbury, by the king, to ascertain the grievances and demands of those turbulent lords; and at the demise of King John, he was so powerful as to prevail upon the barons to appoint a day for the coronation of Henry III., to whom he was constituted guardian, by the rest of the nobility, who had remained firm in their allegiance. He subsequently took up arms in the royal cause, and after achieving a victory over the barons at Lincoln, proceeded directly to London, and investing that great city, both by land and water, reduced it to extremity, for want of provisions. Peace, however, being soon after concluded, it was relieved. His lordship, at this period, executed the office of sheriff for the cos. of Essex and Hertford. This eminent nobleman was no less distinguished by his wisdom in the council and valor in the field, than by his piety and his attachment to the church, of which his numerous munificent endowments bear ample testimony. He had by his wife, Isabel, five sons, who succeeded each other in his lands and honors, and five daughters.

  • Sources 
    1. [S18795]


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